What is the need for modulation

What is the need for modulation

Do you have a radio Did you notice that you can tune into multiple stations on each band of your radio? While tuning into a station, did you notice that you are receiving no (or sometimes very little if AM) signals from other stations?

If you answer "yes", you may find that there has to be a way to distinguish one station from another. If there wasn't a way to do this, your radio announcer would just be making an incomprehensible jumble of sound.

We can do this through modulation. Each broadcasting station generates an audio signal that it "mixes" with the assigned frequency in the radio spectrum assigned to it by the government. OK, sometimes governments don't assign frequencies, but most of the time they do.

EDIT - The "mixing" is better defined by the word "modulation" and this process allows us to tune our radios to the channel we want on the radio band in question.

Leon Heller

The modulation does not allow us to "tune our radios to the desired channel".

Andy aka

@LeonHeller Maybe I'm stupid and don't read into my own words what you see, or maybe you're a pedant, or maybe a little bit of both, but I'll change it and maybe you can leave more comments.

user207421

I agree to @LeonHeller. What you are describing is the result of different carrier frequencies, not the modulation itself. The technical process involved is superposition and not modulation.

Andy aka

@EJP superheterodyning - what part of my answer does this imply?

user207421

@Andyaka All of it. Modulation has nothing to do with the existence and recognizability of different stations. This is ensured by different carrier frequencies and the superhet process.