What does L and R indicate on headphones


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Hello,

It was more or less by chance that I saw the small USB speakers connected to my notebook today. I saw that the two speakers are labeled L and R on the front. At the same moment, I remembered that all of my headphones (hi-fi system, MP3 player, cell phone, etc.) are labeled that way.

But it doesn't matter whether I put L in the left ear and R in the right or does it really have a technical o. Reason why i should pay attention?

It doesn't really matter, it could of course be that, for example, some effect occurs that should consciously go from left to right, and then go from right to left for you.

It doesn't really matter, it could of course be that, for example, some effect occurs that should consciously go from left to right, and then go from right to left for you.


Okay, thank you for the quick answer.

That would be z. B. also with PC games, right? The sound or the like is in the game on the left side, but can it be heard in the right speaker if they are not correctly positioned?

In e.g. Winamp can switch from stereo to just one speaker. And with some pieces of music there are really differences - with you, however, reversed;)

In e.g. Winamp can switch from stereo to just one speaker. And with some pieces of music there are really differences - with you, however, reversed;)


Why should you only switch to one loudspeaker and how far are there differences?

Why should you only switch to one loudspeaker and how far are there differences?

Simulation of mono, although of course there is no real mono, since you simply fade out the other channel, which would of course still be heard with mono.

It is not really a channel that is faded out, but both channels are added together

But it doesn't matter whether I put L in the left ear and R in the right or does it really have a technical o. Reason why i should pay attention?

you have probably heard of stereo sound, haven't you?

2 different channels are used, one for the left and one for the right speaker. if you swapped these now, the whole effort was of course pointless.

It is not really a channel that is faded out, but both channels are added together

Ah, well then of course it's different, but is there also dual mono?

I found two plugins for Winamp, but then the left speaker is extremely noisy because these plugins probably cause problems.


you've probably heard of stereotonic, haven't you?

2 different channels are used, one for the left and one for the right speaker. if you swapped these now, the whole effort was of course pointless.

In the case of music, of course, this is negligible or even irrelevant. With noises that are really position-dependent, of course, it looks completely different again ....

It is not really a channel that is faded out, but both channels are added together
For sure? I mean the channel will be faded out.

In the case of music, of course, this is negligible or even irrelevant. With noises that are really position-dependent, of course, it looks completely different again ....


not really, often enough the 2 channels differ considerably.

That can be, but is it important now with music whether the guitar is more to the right of the listener or to the left?

That may well be, but is it important now with music whether the guitar is more to the right of the listener or to the left?
Yes.

with headphones it is noticeable - the focus is somehow on the right as I think
if I have the wrong way around I notice that

independent of the headphone and playback device

in games it's clear anyway - if you have noises from the left, the opponent is also left - the other way round, that's really banana;)

Swapped channels are irritating even with orchestral music. In symphony orchestras, the individual groups of instruments traditionally have specific places. There are also variants, but one of the main purposes is to ensure that one group of instruments does not destroy the other, which one would then hardly hear.

If, as a listener of classical music, you get the whole thing backwards, that's colossally annoying.

But surely every instrument or group of instruments nowadays has its own pickup / microphone and is then "placed" appropriately by the sound engineer.

But this is of no use if the dear listener sets up / connects the loudspeakers the wrong way round. Amazing that this is such a difficult topic to grasp ...: |

Sure, but there wouldn't be any sound mud, it's just in a different place than it would normally be.

But surely every instrument or group of instruments nowadays has its own pickups / microphones and is then "placed" appropriately by the sound engineer.
Most labels, yes. However, some work consciously only with very few microphones - sometimes only with three (!). There are just different philosophies.
Sure, but there wouldn't be any sound mud, it's just in a different place than it would normally be.
Yes, but that is also irritating. If the first violins are usually always on the left, in the concert hall, in every recording, and then suddenly they come from the right - then the habit simply throws a spanner in the works. Admittedly, it is not more than that.

For sure? I mean the channel will be faded out.

Yes. If no mono signal can really be reproduced (e.g. with MS stereophony), the two channels are added and the level is lowered. If you subtract one channel from a stereo signal that contains different information on both channels, the information on one channel is logically lost. Therefore there are the following possibilities to convert stereo signals to mono (and back):

- addition of L and R.

- The mono compatibility (correlation meter, XY oscilloscope) should be observed. Foregoing effects with too high a stereo width, etc. Then you no longer need to convert the stereo signal, since stereo and mono are almost identical.

- one uses an admission procedure which offers this possibility. Here it also goes backwards.

To L / R:
The biggest problem is with films and games, as they also provide optical information for the brain. If acoustic and optical information do not match, the brain reports an error.
The idea of ​​an orchestra, "optical" information out of habit, can also lead to confusion if there is an acoustic contradiction, but this is not registered as an error. The brain adapts to the new situation relatively quickly and temporarily stops the habit.

Different with the error:

Image: A car drives from left to right.
Sound: A car drives from right to left.

This scenario could be shown to a test person for an hour. Even then, he would still classify this as very strange. Even if the brain's attempts to adapt it are no longer as serious as in the first 2-5 minutes.

In the case of rock music or band music, it is nowhere near that bad, since you already have two options here to mix music.
Either from the audience or towards the audience. In other words: The listener stands in front of the band or is part of the band. This can be roughly simulated by swapping L / R.

To ask? ;)

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