How can I destroy my own soul

When the soul suffers

The vulnerability of the psyche is completely different from person to person: unemployment, divorce or the death of a relative are terrible for some, but surmountable. They plunge the other into years of depression. While physical illnesses are now accepted in our society mental illness in severe cases still stigmatized as “insanity”, in milder cases it is played down as a trivial disease. Mental illnesses are part of our lives. Because the complex interplay between body, mind and the metabolism affecting the brain can easily get out of balance.

Healthy people often find it difficult or impossible to imagine what people with depression, schizophrenia or personality disorder are really feeling. Since mental illnesses always change the entire psychological feeling, the patient experiences himself and the environment completely differently. For example, he hears voices that his fellow human beings do not hear, or feels depressed, is listless and listless, but sometimes also particularly active and motivated. This in turn triggers insecurity, deep feelings of fear and sometimes aggressiveness towards yourself and others. Alienation, incomprehension in the social environment and even complete exclusion are unfortunately still the result of this "being different".

Regardless of the cause of a mental illness, the goal of modern psychiatry is to achieve the "social" healing of the sick person with drug and psychotherapeutic therapy: The patient should be able to cope with everyday life under as normal conditions as possible and be responsible for it To take over life. This goal can be achieved in close and trusting cooperation with doctors, therapists, close friends or family.

However, mental illnesses often disrupt the necessary social network and, in extreme cases, destroy it, which makes social healing more difficult.

Authors

Dr. med. Arne Schäffler in: Gesundheit heute, edited by Dr. med. Arne Schäffler. Trias, Stuttgart, 3rd edition (2014). Revision and update: Dr. med. Sonja Kempinski | last changed on at 14:11